Absurdistan

'conservative' is not a synonyme for 'idiot'

Posts tagged Israel

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eretzyisrael:

BDS-BS #1 Why Do They Single Out Israel?

Dr. Kedar raises the obvious question. If the BDS and like organizations truly have humanitarian goals, why do they single out Israel? The fact is Israel is probably the ONLY country in the Middle East that is NOT an Apartheid State!

  • Syria’s government kills innocent Arabs daily. Where is the BDS outrage?
  • Egyptian civilians have been killed during the ongoing struggle for power. Where is the BDS?
  • Iran hangs its citizens just for being gay. BDS? Anyone? Bueller? 
  • Pakistan? Afghanistan? The entire Middle East EXCEPT Israel enacts their own version of Apartheid. Where is the BDS?!

Tényleg, hol vannak?

Filed under BDS israel

6 notes

Israel: Safest Investments for Riskless Returns

forzionssake:

Israel, under threat of war from its neighbors since being founded in 1948, produced better risk- adjusted returns than all other developed stock markets in the past decade as the technology-driven economy attracted global investors. The ‘Bloomberg Riskless Return Rating’ shows the Tel Aviv TA-25 Index (TA-25) returned 7.6 percent in the 10 years ended Feb. 17, after adjusting for volatility, the highest among 24 developed- nation benchmark indexes. Israel beat Hong Kong’s Hang Seng Index (HSI), the next-best market with a risk-adjusted gain of 6.7 percent, and Norway, which had the highest total return.”

ooops…

Filed under Israel technology stock exchange business

12 notes

ronbarak:

revolutionwatch:

How Israel Expanded.

You forgot to show the map at 1920, after the San Remo conference (confirmed by the Council of the League of Nations on 24 July 1922), where the Jews had all of Palestine (including parts of what is now known as the Kingdom of Jordan).


Nice try, but…. there was a British mandate in Palestina, so the first map of 1946 depicts the geographic region called historically Palestine, under this mandate. The “jewish land” was simply properties, that the jews have bought. It would be interesting to see the properties of the Arab, Turkish, American, British, German, etc landowners too.
The second is a UN plan, which was influenced by the English, who were not interested in creating functional entities in the region. In connection with that, it would be really interesting to see how the entire region has changed. Thus, we could see what happened to those lands, that were meant for the “palestinians”, but were occupied by the “friendly” arab neighbours.  
The third one shows the results of waging wars on Israel by her Arab neighbours.
Not very nice, not to have shown the same region between 1967-1973, or at least to make a remark, that Israel has occupied the Sinai, but in return for signing the peace treaty with Egypt, this land was given back. Including the entire Gaza Strip, that legally belong/belonged to Egypt, and which the Egyptian government did not want to take back.
Finally, looking at the fourth one, a question arises: it seems, that the efforts on liberating the so-called “Palestinian” land result ”Palestine” to keep shrinking. Will the “palestinian” leaders go on, until no land will be left for them?

ronbarak:

revolutionwatch:

How Israel Expanded.

You forgot to show the map at 1920, after the San Remo conference (confirmed by the Council of the League of Nations on 24 July 1922),
where the Jews had all of Palestine (including parts of what is now known as the Kingdom of Jordan).

Nice try, but…. there was a British mandate in Palestina, so the first map of 1946 depicts the geographic region called historically Palestine, under this mandate. The “jewish land” was simply properties, that the jews have bought. It would be interesting to see the properties of the Arab, Turkish, American, British, German, etc landowners too.

The second is a UN plan, which was influenced by the English, who were not interested in creating functional entities in the region. In connection with that, it would be really interesting to see how the entire region has changed. Thus, we could see what happened to those lands, that were meant for the “palestinians”, but were occupied by the “friendly” arab neighbours.  

The third one shows the results of waging wars on Israel by her Arab neighbours.

Not very nice, not to have shown the same region between 1967-1973, or at least to make a remark, that Israel has occupied the Sinai, but in return for signing the peace treaty with Egypt, this land was given back. Including the entire Gaza Strip, that legally belong/belonged to Egypt, and which the Egyptian government did not want to take back.

Finally, looking at the fourth one, a question arises: it seems, that the efforts on liberating the so-called “Palestinian” land result ”Palestine” to keep shrinking. Will the “palestinian” leaders go on, until no land will be left for them?

Filed under so-called palestinians map Israel

80 notes

pappito:

latimes:

Neighborhood pays price of being on wrong side of Israel’s wall: Residents of Kafr Aqab are cut off from most public services, even though they live within Jerusalem’s city limits. The once-upscale area is now a slum.

But when the emergency dispatcher heard that the school was in Kafr Aqab, separated from the rest of Jerusalem by a 36-foot-high concrete wall, he told Abu Rameelh that firetrucks wouldn’t cross Israel’s separation barrier without army protection.

Photo: Israel’s separation barrier has left residents of neighborhoods such as Kafr Aqab cut off from most public services, even though they live within Jerusalem’s city limits, hold residency cards and pay city taxes. Credit: Kevin Frayer / Associated Press

rockets are still able to cross the barrier, aren’t they?

Well, if Kafr Aqab was within the wall, the same newspapers would be writing about occupation of the ancient “Palestinian” land. 
More remarkable, that being cut off from the Israeli (read: jewish) public services, this place has become a slum. How come, that the wealth of the so-called Palestinians depends on the jews, the enemy?
And how does that sound: The border separates Saxony’s Zittau and the town of Hrádek nad Nisou in the Czech Republik. This town pays price of being on wrong side of the German border.

pappito:

latimes:

Neighborhood pays price of being on wrong side of Israel’s wall: Residents of Kafr Aqab are cut off from most public services, even though they live within Jerusalem’s city limits. The once-upscale area is now a slum.

But when the emergency dispatcher heard that the school was in Kafr Aqab, separated from the rest of Jerusalem by a 36-foot-high concrete wall, he told Abu Rameelh that firetrucks wouldn’t cross Israel’s separation barrier without army protection.

Photo: Israel’s separation barrier has left residents of neighborhoods such as Kafr Aqab cut off from most public services, even though they live within Jerusalem’s city limits, hold residency cards and pay city taxes. Credit: Kevin Frayer / Associated Press

rockets are still able to cross the barrier, aren’t they?

Well, if Kafr Aqab was within the wall, the same newspapers would be writing about occupation of the ancient “Palestinian” land. 

More remarkable, that being cut off from the Israeli (read: jewish) public services, this place has become a slum. How come, that the wealth of the so-called Palestinians depends on the jews, the enemy?

And how does that sound: The border separates Saxony’s Zittau and the town of Hrádek nad Nisou in the Czech Republik. This town pays price of being on wrong side of the German border.

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

Filed under so-called palestinians Israel wall germany czech

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The Israeli feel to Hungary’s crisis

By HERB KEINON 01/20/2012 17:
28
BUDAPEST – Hungary feels oddly a bit like Israel these days. Obviously it has nothing to do with the ear lobe-tingling cold and the light snow that regularly dusts Budapest’s streets at this time of year. Nor does it have anything to do with the fairy tale-looking parliament on the banks of the Danube that dominates the capital’s cityscape.
Rather, this Israel-ness is felt in the way today’s Hungary feels intensely isolated, sadly misunderstood by much of the world and badly mistreated by the international press. It feels like Israel because the international discourse about Hungary is dominated by reports of undemocratic legislation, an extreme right-wing party, attempts to control the press and accusations of efforts to pack the judiciary. It feels like Israel because the EU is unabashedly pontificating about how Hungary should run its affairs. And it feels like Israel because right-wing Prime Minister Viktor Orban – who commands a two-thirds majority in parliament – is wildly unpopular abroad Speaking to a dozen journalists from Israel and Europe brought to the country this week for the launching of a year-long commemoration marking Raoul Wallenberg‘s 100th birthday, leading Hungarian politician Gergely Gulyas, vice president of Orban’s Fidesz Party, quipped that he was “extremely surprised by your courage to come to Hungary. The situation is not as bad as seen from abroad." Tamas Lukacs, head of the small KDNP Party affiliated with Fidesz and head of the Hungarian parliament’s Committee on Human Rights, Minority, Civic and Religious Affairs, said all he was requesting from the journalists was to ”ask first and form an opinion later.”
Not only were statements like these variations of comments made by numerous Israeli politicians siting around tables at Jerusalem restaurants over the years with visiting media delegations, but the whole Hungarian press tour itself had an Israeli feel.

Filed under Hungary Israel diplomacy EU

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Statement by Ambassador Ron Prosor, Permanent Representative of Israel to the UN 29 November 2011

eretzyisrael:

Mr. President,

A great Jewish sage once wrote, “The truth can hurt like a thorn, at first; but in the end it blossoms like a rose.”

His words came to my mind today. His insight could really benefit many in this hall.

It takes a well of truth to water the seeds of peace. Yet, we continue to witness a drought of candor in this body’s discussion of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. On this historic day, real facts in the General Assembly remain few and far between.

For any who have been here on November 29th before, today is déjà vu. Some of you may have noticed that some minor changes have been taking place in the Middle East lately, but any changes in this body’s resolutions condemning Israel are very, very rare.

Indeed, it didn’t take a creative writer to craft the language in these resolutions. The exact same text is copied and pasted, year after year – much of it dating back five decades.

The account we heard today is one-sided. It is unilateral. It is unjust. And it is unhelpful. It presents a distorted and impartial version of history.  It transforms the cause of Palestinian self-determination into a deliberate attempt to denigrate, defame, and delegitimize the State of Israel.

The political dynamics in this body are sadly predictable. Every November, the leaves change color in New York, but the automatic anti-Israel majority never changes its votes.

Each and every responsible member of the international community that affixes its seal of approval on this exact same set of resolutions – which are irrelevant at best, and damaging at worst— should do a little soul searching. Is this the message that you want the General Assembly to send to the world?

Mr. President,

Let me take a moment to remind this Assembly about what actually occurred on this day 64 years ago – and in the days that followed.

On November 29, 1947, the United Nations voted to partition then British-Mandate Palestine into two states: one Jewish, one Arab. Two states for two peoples.

The Jewish population accepted that plan and declared a new state in its ancient homeland. It reflected the Zionist conviction that it was both necessary and possible to live in peace with our neighbors in the land of our forefathers.

The Arab inhabitants rejected the plan and launched a war of annihilation against the new Jewish state, joined by the armies of five Arab members of the United Nations.

One percent of Israel’s population died during this assault by five armies. Think about that price. It would be the equivalent of 650,000 dying in France today, or 3 million dying in the United States, or 13 million dying in China.

As a result of the war, there were Arabs who became refugees. A similar number of Jews, who lived in Arab countries, were forced to flee their homes as well. They, too, became refugees.

The difference between these two distinct populations was – and still is – that Israel absorbed the refugees into our society. Our neighbors did not.

Refugee camps in Israel gave birth to thriving towns and cities. Refugee camps in Arab Countries gave birth to more Palestinian refugees.

We unlocked our new immigrants’ vast potential. The Arab World knowingly and intentionally kept their Palestinian populations in the second class status of permanent refugees.

In Lebanon for many years and still today, the law prohibits Palestinians from owning land – and from working in the public sector or as doctors and lawyers. Palestinians are banned from these professions.

In Kuwait, the once significant Palestinian population was forcibly expelled from the country in 1991. Few remain.

In Syria, thousands of Palestinians had to flee refugee camps in Latakia last August when President Assad shelled their homes with naval gunboats.

In the vast majority of Arab Countries, Palestinians have no rights of citizenship. It is no coincidence that the Arab World’s responsibilities for the “inalienable rights” of these Palestinians never appear in the resolutions before you.

Mr. President,

The basic question underlying our conflict for 64 years has not changed. That question is: has the Arab World – and particularly the Palestinians – internalized that Israel is here to stay and will remain the Nation-state of the Jewish People?

It is still unclear whether they are inspired by the promise of building a new state, or the goal of destroying an existing one.

Two months ago, President Abbas stood at the podium in this very hall and tried to erase the unbroken and unbreakable connection between the Jewish people and the Land of Israel.

He said the following:

“I come before you today from the Holy Land, the land of Palestine, the land of divine messages, ascension of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) and the birthplace of Jesus Christ (peace be upon him).”

This was not an oversight. It was not a slip of the tongue. It was yet another deliberate attempt to deny and erase more than 3,000 years of Jewish history. The Arab leaders from those two nations that sought peace have offered a different message.

For example, in 1995, King Hussein came to the United States and said (quote): “For our part, we shall continue to work for the new dawn when all the Children of Abraham and their descendants are living together in the birthplace of their three great monotheistic religions.”

In 1977, President Sadat came to Israel’s Knesset and quoted this verse from the Koran: “We believe in God and in what has been revealed to us and what was revealed to Abraham, Ismail, Isaac, Jacob, and the tribes and in the books given to Moses, Jesus, and the prophets from their lord.”

President Sadat and King Hussein spoke of THREE monotheistic religions, not ONE or TWO.

Mr. President,

The resolution that gives the 29th of November significance – General Assembly resolution 181 – speaks of the creation of a “Jewish State” no less than 25 times. We still do not hear Palestinian leaders utter the term.  

The Palestinian leadership refuses to acknowledge Israel’s character as a Jewish state. You will never hear them say “two states for two peoples”. If you ever hear a Palestinian leader say “two states for two peoples”, please phone me immediately. My office has set up the equivalent of a 9/11 number in the event of such an unprecedented occurrence.

Read More

(Source: israel-un.org, via movedtoanewplace)

Filed under un Israel so-called palestinians ron prosor

17 notes

Turkey requests aid from Israel

Turkey requests aid from Israel

The Jerusalem Post:

Defense minister instructs officials to fly special equipment to Turkey after Turkish authorities request assistance from Israel; death toll from 7.2-magnitude earthquake rise to 432 as rescue efforts continue.

Defense Minister Ehud Barak on Tuesday gave special instructions to relevant members of the defense establishment to fly special equipment to Turkey to aid in the country’s rescue and recovery, following a deadly earthquake in the Van district on Monday.

According to a statement released by Barak, the decision to send the equipment to Turkey came after Turkish authorities requested assistance from Israel.

The statement did not specify what type of equipment was being sent.

The death toll from the 7.2-magnitude quake rose to 432, from an earlier 366 on Tuesday, the Disaster and Emergency Administration said. The final count was likely to rise further as many people were still missing and 2,262 buildings had collapsed.

Well…

(Source: movedtoanewplace)

Filed under turkey Israel

11 notes

Tea Party strong on Israel

forzionssake:

In late May, Republicans and GOP leaners who agree with the Tea Party movement overwhelmingly sympathized more with Israel than the Palestinians. Fully 79% sympathized more with Israel, compared with 54% of non-Tea Party Republicans and 41% of Democrats and Democratic leaners. The differences were even starker in views of Obama’s handling of this issue: 68% of Tea Party Republicans said Obama favors the Palestinians too much, compared with just 23% of non-Tea Party Republicans and 8% of Democrats.”

Filed under Tea Party US so-called palestinians Israel

14 notes

Cyprus seeks alliance with Israel, cite common antagonism incited by Turkey

forzionssake:

In the security realm, several interlocutors proposed a full-on alliance with Israel. Cyprus would gain from Israel’s much greater military, economic, and diplomatic prowess. Israel, which has already made protective efforts on behalf of Cyprus, would benefit from access to an airbase at Paphos, 185 miles from its shore, belonging to a European Union member.

so, if I get that right:

- Israel (enemy of the EU and Turkey) has an open access to the NATO airspace, and

 -protects Cyprus, an EU-member, against

 - Turkey, a NATO-member.

But as Turkey

- is a potential threat to Cyprus and Greece, two EU-members,

- who are now allies of Israel, that helps protecting themselves from Turkey, their NATO ally.

Add to this, that Turkey is going against Iran, Syria and the Kurds (also enemies of the EU). So, if Turkey has a conflict with Iran/Syria,

- the EU and NATO member Greece and Cyprus must fight to protect one enemy (Turkey), form the other enemy (Iran/Syria),

- while they have an alliance with Israel, enemy of both Turkey, Iran, Syria and the EU. 

That’s a real joke :-)

Filed under Cyprus iran turkey syria Israel EU NATO