Absurdistan

'conservative' is not a synonyme for 'idiot'

Posts tagged media

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Obama’s Orwellian FCC: Hey, let’s put monitors in every newsroom This story doesn’t come from some crazy, anti-Obama conspiracy web site. This comes from Ajit Pai, a commissioner at the FCC, writing in the the Wall Street Journal. According to him, the Obama administration’s FCC is primed to begin a trial period for a new program aimed at newsrooms across the country. The stated objective is a “Multi-Market Study of Critical Information Needs” to obtain the “the process by which stories are selected.” From The Wall Street Journal: News organizations often disagree about what Americans need to know. MSNBC, for example, apparently believes that traffic in Fort Lee, N.J., is the crisis of our time. Fox News, on the other hand, chooses to cover the September 2012 attacks on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi more heavily than other networks. The American people, for their part, disagree about what they want to watch. But everyone should agree on this: The government has no place pressuring media organizations into covering certain stories. Unfortunately, the Federal Communications Commission, where I am a commissioner, does not agree. Last May the FCC proposed an initiative to thrust the federal government into newsrooms across the country. With its “Multi-Market Study of Critical Information Needs,” or CIN, the agency plans to send researchers to grill reporters, editors and station owners about how they decide which stories to run. A field test in Columbia, S.C., is scheduled to begin this spring. The purpose of the CIN, according to the FCC, is to ferret out information from television and radio broadcasters about “the process by which stories are selected” and how often stations cover “critical information needs,” along with “perceived station bias” and “perceived responsiveness to underserved populations.” How does the FCC plan to dig up all that information? First, the agency selected eight categories of “critical information” such as the “environment” and “economic opportunities,” that it believes local newscasters should cover. It plans to ask station managers, news directors, journalists, television anchors and on-air reporters to tell the government about their “news philosophy” and how the station ensures that the community gets critical information. The FCC also wants to wade into office politics. One question for reporters is: “Have you ever suggested coverage of what you consider a story with critical information for your customers that was rejected by management?” Follow-up questions ask for specifics about how editorial discretion is exercised, as well as the reasoning behind the decisions. Read the Rest (H/T: ACLJ) This is scary people. This is Marxist dictator type stuff here. It should be noted that the questions from the FCC don’t have to be answered, as participation in the program is “voluntary.” But, as is explained in the article, the FCC has the power to withhold licenses from whom it will. If it doesn’t like what a news organization is doing, it will simply prevent them from operating. In other words, the government will control the media.

Obama’s Orwellian FCC: Hey, let’s put monitors in every newsroom


This story doesn’t come from some crazy, anti-Obama conspiracy web site. This comes from Ajit Pai, a commissioner at the FCC, writing in the the Wall Street Journal. According to him, the Obama administration’s FCC is primed to begin a trial period for a new program aimed at newsrooms across the country. The stated objective is a “Multi-Market Study of Critical Information Needs” to obtain the “the process by which stories are selected.”

From The Wall Street Journal:

News organizations often disagree about what Americans need to know. MSNBC, for example, apparently believes that traffic in Fort Lee, N.J., is the crisis of our time. Fox News, on the other hand, chooses to cover the September 2012 attacks on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi more heavily than other networks. The American people, for their part, disagree about what they want to watch.

But everyone should agree on this: The government has no place pressuring media organizations into covering certain stories.

Unfortunately, the Federal Communications Commission, where I am a commissioner, does not agree. Last May the FCC proposed an initiative to thrust the federal government into newsrooms across the country. With its “Multi-Market Study of Critical Information Needs,” or CIN, the agency plans to send researchers to grill reporters, editors and station owners about how they decide which stories to run. A field test in Columbia, S.C., is scheduled to begin this spring.

The purpose of the CIN, according to the FCC, is to ferret out information from television and radio broadcasters about “the process by which stories are selected” and how often stations cover “critical information needs,” along with “perceived station bias” and “perceived responsiveness to underserved populations.”

How does the FCC plan to dig up all that information? First, the agency selected eight categories of “critical information” such as the “environment” and “economic opportunities,” that it believes local newscasters should cover. It plans to ask station managers, news directors, journalists, television anchors and on-air reporters to tell the government about their “news philosophy” and how the station ensures that the community gets critical information.

The FCC also wants to wade into office politics. One question for reporters is: “Have you ever suggested coverage of what you consider a story with critical information for your customers that was rejected by management?” Follow-up questions ask for specifics about how editorial discretion is exercised, as well as the reasoning behind the decisions.

Read the Rest (H/T: ACLJ)
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304680904579366903828260732

This is scary people. This is Marxist dictator type stuff here.

It should be noted that the questions from the FCC don’t have to be answered, as participation in the program is “voluntary.” But, as is explained in the article, the FCC has the power to withhold licenses from whom it will. If it doesn’t like what a news organization is doing, it will simply prevent them from operating. In other words, the government will control the media.

http://poorrichardsnews.com/post/77384315714/obamas-orwellian-fcc-hey-lets-put-monitors-in-every

Filed under obama fcc monitor media media control

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Breivik, Zschäpe: Martyrs Or European Freedom Fighters

What the civilised West (wtf???) does not want to beleieve is now simply reality. The Palestinian method has been copied and applied succesfully. And applied in the West.

Breivik caims he is a freedom-fighter, fighting against the islamization of Europe and this resonates in the hearts of many. Now, he is going international, creating a network of imprisoned freedom-fighters.

He wrote a letter to Beate Zschäpe, to the only one surviving member of the Zwickau Terror Cell, and contacted Peter Mangs, a swedish man accused of “racism” motivated killings.

Now it is time, BBC, Guardian and the rest of the bias-media to print on the front pages: who is a terrorist for one, that is a freedom-fighter for an other.

Filed under Breivik Zschäpe terrorism media

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washingtonpoststyle:

The United States has fallen 27 places in the Press Freedom Index. The reason? The many arrests of journalists covering Occupy protests.

This is also a way to make fake stats… but on the other hand, it has nothing to do with the freedom of press, if a journalist resists the police, and is therefore arrested.
If a police officer says please move on, or please leave, just do it. Or take the consequences….

washingtonpoststyle:

The United States has fallen 27 places in the Press Freedom Index. The reason? The many arrests of journalists covering Occupy protests.

This is also a way to make fake stats… but on the other hand, it has nothing to do with the freedom of press, if a journalist resists the police, and is therefore arrested.

If a police officer says please move on, or please leave, just do it. Or take the consequences….

(via theatlantic)

Filed under press media freedom of press

21 notes

medinatyisrael:

Never mind journalistic honesty or integrity, just a palliwood-style journalism

Palliwood Is Alive And Well—Media Bias Uncovered by Ruben Salvadori

When in his reportage we see a youth standing in defiance, stone in hand, face covered, flames and smoke in the background, we normally assume he is in the midst of a raging battle. But, as Salvadori shows, that may not necessarily be the case, because there may be no battle at all at the time the picture is taken. The subject is simply posing for the camera. Partly because it serves a propaganda purpose, partly because he hopes that the publication of that picture will gain him his 15 minutes of fame. And the photo reporter goes for the snapshot because the picture is in any case representative, symbolic enough to tell the world about the war he or she is witnessing.
Media – Photo journalism behind the scenes, from Planet Next, describing Ruben Salvadori’s work

Here is the revealing video put together by Ruben Salvadori, illustrating the media bias behind the pictures we see of the Israel-Palestinian conflict:

(Source: daledamos.blogspot.com, via movedtoanewplace)

Filed under Palestinians deceit israel lies media photo

10 notes

Western media biased on Syria conflict – Russian delegation head

23:07 21/09/2011
MOSCOW, September 21 (RIA Novosti)

Western media outlets are not reporting the true situation in Syria, the head of a delegation of Russian lawmakers said on Wednesday.

The delegation of senators, chaired by Federation Council Deputy Chairman Ilyas Umakhanov, paid a two-day visit to Syria at the weekend. The delegation met with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, as well as with leaders of the opposition.

 “We are convinced that a host of Western TV channels have distorted what is really happening there,” Umakhanov said. “People are calmly walking along the streets, shops are open, and children are going to school.”

He also suggested it was an oversimplification to suggest that Syria was split between the “repressive” authorities and the opposition.

Umakhanov also said that Assad had invited Russian journalists and their foreign colleagues working in Russia to visit Syria and asses the situation for themselves.

Moscow favors a political solution to the six-month confrontation between the Syrian authorities and the opposition, while the United States and the European Union have called on President Bashar Al-Assad to quit.

The UN says at least 2,200 people have been killed in a crackdown on opposition protests since the start of the unrest in March.

Never mentioned in a media near you?

Filed under Russia Syria media

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pappito:

The Southern Cross Cable
Construction of the cable began in July 1999, and was in use by customers by November 2000. Additional works and upgrades have since taken place to increase the network’s capacity to 480 Gbit/s. In August 2007, SC Cables announced it had contracted with Alcatel-Lucent to upgrade the cable to 660 Gbit/s by the end of the first quarter 2008 and to 860 Gbit/s by the end of 2008, with future upgrades possible to 2.4 Tbit/s.  The company is owned by Telecom New Zealand (50%), SingTel (40%) and Verizon Business (10%).
Submarine network segments
Submarine
A. Alexandria-Whenuapai (2280 km)
C. Takapuna-Spencer Beach (8000 km)
D. Spencer Beach-Morro Bay (4135 km)
F. Kahe Point-Hillsboro, Oregon (4540 km)
G1. Suva-Kahe Point (5830 km)
G2. Brookvale-Suva (3540 km)
I. Spencer Beach-Kahe Point (460 km)
Landing points
   Alexandria, NSW, Australia
   Brookvale, NSW, Australia    
   Suva, Fiji
   Whenuapai, New Zealand
   Takapuna, New Zealand
   Kahe Point, Hawaii, USA
   Samuel M. Spencer Beach, Hawaii, USA
   Hillsboro, Oregon, USA
   San Jose, California, USA (Terrestrial Connection only)
   Morro Bay, California, USA

pappito:

The Southern Cross Cable

Construction of the cable began in July 1999, and was in use by customers by November 2000. Additional works and upgrades have since taken place to increase the network’s capacity to 480 Gbit/s. In August 2007, SC Cables announced it had contracted with Alcatel-Lucent to upgrade the cable to 660 Gbit/s by the end of the first quarter 2008 and to 860 Gbit/s by the end of 2008, with future upgrades possible to 2.4 Tbit/s.  The company is owned by Telecom New Zealand (50%), SingTel (40%) and Verizon Business (10%).

Submarine network segments

Submarine

  • A. Alexandria-Whenuapai (2280 km)
  • C. Takapuna-Spencer Beach (8000 km)
  • D. Spencer Beach-Morro Bay (4135 km)
  • F. Kahe Point-Hillsboro, Oregon (4540 km)
  • G1. Suva-Kahe Point (5830 km)
  • G2. Brookvale-Suva (3540 km)
  • I. Spencer Beach-Kahe Point (460 km)

Landing points

  •    Alexandria, NSW, Australia
  •    Brookvale, NSW, Australia   
  •    Suva, Fiji
  •    Whenuapai, New Zealand
  •    Takapuna, New Zealand
  •    Kahe Point, Hawaii, USA
  •    Samuel M. Spencer Beach, Hawaii, USA
  •    Hillsboro, Oregon, USA
  •    San Jose, California, USA (Terrestrial Connection only)
  •    Morro Bay, California, USA

Filed under The Southern Cross Cable media technology

18 notes

Anne Applebaum: Indeed, when the authors of the American constitution worried about the "tyranny of the majority," they might have had Viktor Orban, the Hungarian prime minister, in mind.

napifix:

És rólam egy mondat:

A friend, now suspended from his job at Hungarian national radio for opposing the media law, says the chilly atmosphere at a recent editorial meeting was “like the [Stalinist] ’50s” - except, of course, that it was funny, not scary, and no one was tortured afterward.

(Source: mutyimondo, via ukridge)

Filed under Anne Applebaum Washington Post Orbán Viktor médiaszabályozás media

9 notes

Hungary and media freedom

hettie:

ukridge:

An FCO spokesperson said:

“Freedom of the press is at the heart of a free society. We hope that the Hungarian Government will soon resolve this issue satisfactorily and that it will not impact adversely on the successful delivery of the Hungarian EU Presidency.”

tyűűű!

Or, in these hard times of WikiLeaks jeopardy, other governments may want to pick the Hungarian method too. Face it, control over the media is a temptation for every gov’t. Look at BBC/Guardian…

Filed under media

Notes

Természetesen nem ismerjük el a Médiatanácsot a hazai sajtó felügyeleti szerveként. Attól ugyanis, hogy a törvényesen megválasztott parlamenti többség hadat üzen mindazon értékeknek (a magántulajdontól a szólásszabadságig), amelyeknek tiszteletben tartására fölesküdött, Magyarország elmúlt húsz éve még a mienk marad. Ezen a húsz éven nem sok mindent lehet szeretni - nekünk is nehezen ment az elmúlt években. De azt nem lehet elvenni ezektől az évtizedektől, hogy Magyarország ezernyi nyavalyájával együtt szabad ország volt, és mi továbbra is így, szabadon és ehhez a szabad Magyarországhoz hűségesen szeretjük.

Publicisztika: Törvényen túl, törvényen kívül ((Bogár Zsoltnak és Mong Attilának))

… és tehettek egy szívességet a Médiatanácsnak. Meg mindenki más is. Ugyanis szart sem ér a harag hatalom nélkül.

(Source: tolomakontentot)

Filed under Mong Attila media

3 notes

Umberto Eco az információ nincstelenjeiről

“Megvan a veszélye annak, hogy létrejön egy rendkívül informált felhasználókból álló elit, amelyik teljesen tisztában van azzal, hogy hol és mikor keresse a híreket és létrejön egy másik réteg, amelyet nyugodtan nevezhetünk az információ nincstelenjeinek, mert semmit sem fognak tudni a világ dolgiról a kétfejű borjú megszületésén kívül.”

Filed under Umberto Eco media

11 notes

Setting limit to RDA of Junk Media: A sajtó muszlim sirokat dózeroltat Jeruzsálemben, a hirlánc végképp diszfunkcionálissá vált

sronti:

Vajon más témákban szeretik az újságírók kijavítani a hibáikat? Nem valamilyen érzékeny területre gondolok, hanem mondjuk a rák ellenszerének 1242342646-dik felfedezése után láttál valamilyen helyesbítést miután kiderült, hogy kamu az egész? Szerintem nem.

A szerkesztők egyéni…

Egyszerűen arról van szó, hogy az újságíró ma már egyszerűen nem érti azt, amiről ír. Az újságíró szó eredetileg nem a hülye szinonímája volt…

Ukridge:

"A sok évvel ezelőtti sztoriknak meg az a köze bármihez, hogy a légkondis szeriben morálhegyet épitő firkászok jobban aggódnak az arab sirokért, mint maguk az arabok. És ezek azok a pontok, amin előbb utóbb el kell gondolkodniuk a világ terheit vállukon cipelőknek.

Nem fogok elnézést kérni senkitől azért, mert a hireket megpróbálom komolyan venni, még a Közel-keletieket is.”

Nem fognak elgondolkodni, mert az alapproblémát nem értik. Aki meg érti, az azért kapja a pénzét, hogy fake híreket gyártson. A trend szerencsére önjavítő mechanizmust jelez: a lakosság bő 99%-a egyre gyorsuló ütemben szakad le a valóság folyamatairól és hamarosan eléri az információs nincstelenség állapotát. 

A jelenlegi hírverseny arra a feltételezésre épül, hogy az embereket érdeklik a hírek ÉS megvannak a szükséges ismereteik ahhoz, hogy a híreket kontextusba helyezzék, azaz értelmezzék. A hidegháború vége és a globális kereskedelmi TV-hálózatok megjelenése azonban alaposan átformálta a helyzetet.

Umberto Eco mondta a következőket:

"Megvan a veszélye annak, hogy létrejön egy rendkívül informált felhasználókból álló elit, amelyik teljesen tisztában van azzal, hogy hol és mikor keresse a híreket és létrejön egy másik réteg, amelyet nyugodtan nevezhetünk az információ nincstelenjeinek, mert semmit sem fognak tudni a világ dolgiról a kétfejű borjú megszületésén kívül."

Filed under hírek fake media media Umberto Eco